Skip to main content

Menstrual Leave, Discrimination or Necessity?

A recent news notification brought to our notice that two of Indian companies have started a culture of menstruation leave for their female employees. Though many foreign countries have already given this gesture to their female staff which allows them a day off when they come across with their menstruation cramp every month. In countries like Japan, Taiwan, Indonesia and South Korea, working women have legitimate right for paid leave if and when they are not able to work during their periods. Some countries, like Germany, even wanted to allow paid leave of upto three days for working ladies with regard to social sustainability concerns. However, this brought up a debate on this matter that continues till now.


The debate is about how fair and important are the menstrual leaves. On one hand we all know how hard it may be to manage at workplace for a women on the first day of her periods, we also know a day of paid leave is a loss of business. Some people including women believe that a law allowing women menstrual leave would discourage and refrain employers from hiring them. There are also critics who believe that this gesture of women social security is going to encourage issues of gender discrimination. There are some professions, like the police services or being a sports person, in which it may be hard to give a women her menstrual leave when she has to perform. Though it is also argued that even if women are not allowed a leave when facing such cramp, they would be hardly able to give their 100% to the business.

A research on reproductive health in London explores that period pain can be as “bad as having a heart attack” and I as a women, I have experienced it. I know how all women manage to live with it during their periods. When at the workplace, our period trouble is easily noticed by everyone around. To our female co-workers, it is easy to indicate what is there causing us look uncomfortable. But to the male co-workers and friends, it is not easy to explain this discomfort. Even to the most open minded women, it is a bit of hesitation as mere indications would not be sufficient to tell them what we are going through. And explain it completely is something seriously not to be attempted at least for that moment. Hence, “I am not well today”, “it’s just a bit of weakness”, “there’s stomach pain” or “have some fever today” are the common excuses we make. Aren’t these? But have you ever wondered why we cannot openly say that “I am suffering from period cramp today”, after all menstruation or period cramps are no disease women suffer from. These are as natural as our month end salary. 


Whatever be it, Culture Machine, a media agency that has recently announced menstrual leaves for its female staff has also determined to file a petition to make menstrual leave a legal right of all working women in our country. Women are full of strength, creativity and talent and respecting their biological distinction with men is not promoting discrimination, according to me. Instead, it is encouraging participation of women more open mindedly and more generously. Possibly, not a paid leave but a menstrual leave is something that would allow most of us to escape from giving silly excuses when the reason of our day off can be perfectly explained as “a menstrual leave”.

Listen This Post Stop Listening Post

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

#TheWomanThatIAm #RRxMM I am not the woman who..

I am not the mother who..
I am not the mother who stayed longer with her newborn, I resumed office when he was barely 2 months old. I am not the mother who witnessed each of my kid's milestones, I got to know them when being told. I am not the mother who could tell breastfeeding stories, my child is a formula-fed gold. I am not the mother who keeps the house spotless, I let my son scatter toys and go overbold. I am not the mother who manages a detailed list for parenting chores, I often keep my to-dos on hold. I am not the mother whom people admire, I hear people calling me selfish and cold.
ALSO I am a doting mother who tries to juggle between family and work every other minute.  I am a mother who watches silly cartoons with my boy.  I am a mother who repeatedly tells the same story every night.  I am a mother who cooks my son's favorite food every week.  And I am also a mother who is the closest person in my son's life!
I am not the wife who..
I am not the wife who has her biological…

My 'Invisible' Accomplishments #DecadeHop #RRxMM

As we entered 2020, through this post I am trying to contemplate the coolest, most daring, and most significant feats of my life during the last decade. Now the more I regress my memory, the more I feel there are two types of achievements or accomplishments that I can ponder upon; Visible and Invisible. Visible ones are those that I can count on my finger like a parrot and others can nod also. I got specs on, married to a not-so-romantic man, produced a baby, started writing and added good 17 kgs in my body volume (I was 50 in 2011). However, there are many invisible accomplishments too that either I know silently or very few can assert.

From 2011 to 2019, Who am I now

From a coy soul to now an outspoken woman, the trek was not easy. I achieved it. From being a no-makeup girl to now a lipstick swatches observer, the transition was tough. But it happened. And from being a sweet hater to now a sweet lover, the change was mysterious yet occurred. And now I can die for Gulab Jamuns. And I…

My Monsoon Love Hate Love Story

Last year, almost the same time, I packed every belonging of mine and landed to a place which is close to my heart. With bag and baggage, my family moved from Delhi to Lucknow. It was monsoon time when I came here and thank god I witnessed a prosperous rain. Lucknow, though smaller compared to Delhi, is a place I distinguish since childhood. The city of Nawabs is believed as the happiest city in India. As our move was well calculated, my husband and I made sure to have all those things in our lives that I missed being in Delhi. A bigger house (that we can afford), green surroundings, street food access that we missed in Delhi and people who talk in our native tongue.

The Hate Story

I hated the rain when I was in Delhi. My house was in a busy lane of a crowded Delhi locality, and I was living on the second floor of the building. Hence neither I had easy access to the road, nor to terrace. When it rained, I was forced to stay inside. Roads used to get sunk even after the rain of half an…