Skip to main content

So, you don't believe in Valentine's day?


As valentine’s day approaches every year, with comes a flood of blogs/posts with titles like “Every Day is Valentine’s Day”, “Love is eternal, not made for a single day” and many other similar ones criticizing the celebration of Valentine’s day to some extent. Well, I have no problem with the message that these blogs try to convey. I also believe that Love is something divine. Nothing is better than being in love with someone. But why hating a day which reminds us about celebrating love our lives? Be it your spouse or kids.
At its heart, on 14th February we celebrate the legacy of Saint Valentine of Rome, a second-century priest who was persecuted by the Roman Empire for serving Christians and refusing to quit his faith in Jesus. It is said that he was imprisoned for performing weddings for soldiers who were forbidden to marry, thus becoming the patron saint of love-struck couples. And this is the whole story behind this lovey dovey and highly misunderstood festival. As per legends, this day has nothing to do with red color flowers, heart shaped chocolates and cupid-inspired cards. But definitely, this day has something to do with sacrificial love and celebrating the free will to love in today’s world. I too am a person who thinks Valentine’s Day should not be considered as a way of asking expensive gifts and luxury items from your spouse. No, not at all. However, I am against of saying that “This is a western culture thing.” “ This day has given couples a medium to express their love in public.” OR, “ Everyday is Valentine’s Day”.
Now, I would focus my thoughts keeping in mind our Indian culture. We have specific days for festivals here, like Diwali, Holi, Eid, we celebrate them all on a particular day. The mythological facts behind Diwali don’t say that people should spend money on crackers. But people do. Holika Dahan is only about the victory of Good over evil. But people play colors, drink and even tease others in the name of celebrating a DAY which is Holi. Then why not give a day to Saint Valentine who helped many in-love couples and gave the world a reason to value LOVE. It is completely okay if your spouse doesn’t believe in Valentine’s Day. I would say, it is wisdom to respect his/her choice and celebrate/not celebrate Valentine’s Day. If your relationship is going well and you have proved yourselves in times of hardships and brokenness, you are fortunate to have a life full of love. If your spouse understands you the most, if he/she has accepted your good and worst shades with equal treatment and if he/she has never left your side, believe me, this is called true affection. This is the spirit of romance.
I am not saying everyone should celebrate this day. But I believe this day can be a powerful reminder of why you fell in love with your spouse and it can rekindle all those warm and fuzzy feelings which couples hide inside. Also, you should not expect one day to accomplish which you have not done in 365 days before. It is almost impossible to achieve. However, you can at least give seed to a new relationship. You can start giving more attention to your spouse. You can try doing what your spouse like but you don’t. Please remember, there is no need to BUY anything for celebrating Valentine’s Day. Give your spouse/family something which money can’t buy but has importance in your relationship. LOVE.

This post is for #MONDAYMOMMYMOMENTS and linked with Deepa and Amrita.

Healthwealthbridge
Listen This Post Stop Listening Post

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My Monsoon Love Hate Love Story

Last year, almost the same time, I packed every belonging of mine and landed to a place which is close to my heart. With bag and baggage, my family moved from Delhi to Lucknow. It was monsoon time when I came here and thank god I witnessed a prosperous rain. Lucknow, though smaller compared to Delhi, is a place I distinguish since childhood. The city of Nawabs is believed as the happiest city in India. As our move was well calculated, my husband and I made sure to have all those things in our lives that I missed being in Delhi. A bigger house (that we can afford), green surroundings, street food access that we missed in Delhi and people who talk in our native tongue.

The Hate Story

I hated the rain when I was in Delhi. My house was in a busy lane of a crowded Delhi locality, and I was living on the second floor of the building. Hence neither I had easy access to the road, nor to terrace. When it rained, I was forced to stay inside. Roads used to get sunk even after the rain of half an…

The Utopian World Of Smart Devices

I would like to start this post with telling readers my profession. I am a software professional who has a decade of experience in technology and software development. In those 10 years, I have very closely seen how technology has evolved. Of course, the first urge was the necessity that let every invention happen. And then technology got advanced to make the user experience better and further sound. In the chain of making every sort of experience pleasanter for users, the era of smart devices came. We all remember the time when smartphones came into the market. Before that, we had those dial phones and keypad mobiles. We were able to talk to the other party. But the progression of technology made it real to actually see with whom we talk. We still talk through phones but with added feel and warmth.

The Utopian World Of Smart Devices

Not only smartphones, but there has been an exponential increase in the number of smart devices around us in the last 5 years. When I first heard the ter…

The Tradition of Respecting and Celebrating Food

This post is for #BharatKaZaika is a blogging event conducted by #BlogBoosterIndia. 

A story to begin with

After winning the great battle of kurukshetra, Yudhisthira was now king of Hastinapur. And then one day, all of sudden Krishna went to Yudhishithira and started saying in urgency "dadasvannam dadasvannam dadasvannam yudhisthira (“Give food! Give food! Give food! Yudhisthira). As the great battle had affected everyone in the country, food was the first way to start giving relief to the suffering countrymen.  As suggested by Krishna, yudhisthira then organized the great asvamedha-yajna. Mahabharata records an extraordinary celebration of distributing food as a part of the sacred year-long rites and rituals.

Our food heritage

You see, In our country, there is a tradition of respecting and celebrating food. The spirit of classical Indian civilization guided that primary duty of the king is to ensure that none within his domain suffers from hunger. Hence the king ensured that people…