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I am supporting ban on firecrackers

Yesterday our honourable Supreme Court extended the ban on the sale of firecrackers in Delhi until October 31. Now; initially I also thought this ban is just insufficient in taming the ever-increasing air pollution in Delhi. However, I was wrong. I realized it when I read people reacting on this order so abruptly and sadly. A large number of the crowd is against this verdict. On the other side, many welcomed this ban as a silver line in the grey clouds of the everyday battle for life. 
First notice what the apex court observed “Let's try out at least one Diwali without firecrackers,”  Isn't it more of an appeal than an order?
Every winter Delhi pays a heavy price as air pollution increases exponentially. Now I don't want to count reasons why this happens every year during the start of winter. However, I am sure about one thing that firecrackers give a good contribution in turning our pink lungs into dangerous black coloured. Not sure, if you are aware of the fact that court has maintained the ban based on a petition filed by three children. "We are the most vulnerable category when it comes to air pollution, especially from suspended particles and toxins. We are foremost prone to lung disease, asthma, coughing, bronchitis, retarded development of the nervous system and cognitive impairment," the children's petition had argued, referring to the fundamental right to life. I have my house in a huddled area of Delhi. And being a mother of a 3-year old kid, I am very fearful due to the degrading quality of air in my surroundings. 

If I recall my experiences of last year, post-Diwali, I read many posts on pollution masks. I enquired so much about pollution types that Delhi suffered and how that could affect small kids. I also wrote a few posts about buying pollution mask and why it's needed in today's time. Again that time is coming; horrible winters of Delhi and I am again thinking about buying pollution mask as I see no other substitute!

Do you believe if I say that Delhi's children have lungs of chain smokers? It is a sad reality and the children I am referring here also have the weakest lungs in India. Isn't this fact enough to welcome the ban on crackers? 



I feel pity the people who are criticizing this ban saying burning crackers is suggested in Hindu mythological books and stories. I don't think this is true. And even if it is there in our mythological inscribes, our ancestors would have never thought about a time when people are fighting for pure breath.While many of people made fun of this ban, and cracker manufacturers challenged the ban on the grounds that it would impact livelihoods, the court still is no mood to change this. 

Now coming to the suggestions that our country's modern and intelligent people are giving contradicting the court verdict. Yes, we can have time slots allotted for firecrackers. Yes, we can ban only certain types of firecrackers. And yes we can think about organic or environment-friendly crackers. But such slots and bans need to be enforced without question. And who is going to validate whether these rules are getting followed or not? Neither we have enough security forces to enforce disciple, nor we see common sense among people that they should spend minimally on firecrackers. Saying that the court is targetting a Hindu festival is the worst. Polluted air doesn't affect us based on our religion or cost. Or, availability of breathable
 air cannot be categorised based on what festivals we celebrate. 

I hold people should understand the gravity of the matter. They should accept that fact that now we have become so irresponsible that our court is now deciding how we should celebrate a festival. In the quest of finding a solution to unremittingly multiplying pollution, there has to be a start. And this ban on firecrackers, I see as the first step. Let's all pledge to maintain the dignity of this verdict. Let's not try to take a side in the battle of life versus livelihood.  We need both; however, livelihood can have alternates but life cannot. 

(for image: credit to its owner)
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Comments

  1. I completely agree. No celebration is more important than health. Diwali can be celebrated without firecrackers too, in fact it is called the Festival of Lights so let's rejoice in the diyas and kandils and have some mithai. :)

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    Replies
    1. So agree with you. Nothing is above health. And it's high time when we should think about celebrating out festivals without affecting environment.

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  2. Diwali isn't just about firecrackers right. One year wouldn't do any harm. I wish people were more open minded to changes.

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  3. I am completely in for a cracker free Diwali. In fast last year too, though it was my baby's first Diwali, we avoided crackers completely.

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  4. I have been going cracker free for almost 10 years now. I just don't get the pleasure people derive from bursting crackers that make ear numbing noise and blinding fumes! If it were a must and only to uphold a tradition, it could be done by lighting one phuljhari too ! But given the way we are, I think we need some inventions in this space like crackers safe for the environment, for I don't see 'people' understanding and stopping cracker bursting anytime soon ! I am sorry your family has to go through this ordeal every year. Wish you a happy and safe Diwali!

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  5. I completely agree with what you have expressed in this post. people literally burn money on diwali in the name of enjoyment and then suffer from diseases which are their own doing.

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  6. I agree with your point Shipra, I am also a supporter of this ban on firecrackers. Time has come that we people take charge of our lives, and think what impact our actions are going to have on coming generations. Thanks for writing this. Sharing it!

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  7. Although I love fire crackers and cant imagine diwali without them, the pollution part is scary. Especially what happened in Delhi last year was something which needs proper attention.

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  8. Keeping the environmental hazards in view, ban on fire crackers is important. These days whatever verdict is passed is always counter questioned based on religion or others. The real purpose of the order goes unnoticed. Why don't people realize the quality of the firecrackers have changed from the previous years.. The fumes are dangerous for anyone.. There has to be some regulation in these celebrations as things go out of hand.

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  9. Here in New Jersey we just had a fireworks ban lifted and I can't tell you how excited everyone is. I think regulation should be there not banning.

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  10. This is such a good news that the government has chosen to rise above demands from businesses and religious mafia to pass this rule. I really do hope it will make an impact on the air quality and then all the naysayers will see that they were wrong. And this will also give impetus to fire cracker makers to come up with less polluting or environmentally friendly alternatives.

    ReplyDelete

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