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With Pathshala Funwala, English is so much fun

“I am blogging about Pathshala Funwala by Nihar Shanti Amla Oil in association with BlogAdda
A few weeks back, 7 years old grandson of my cook aunty ‘Jimmy’ came to my house.  Jimmy’s mother and my cook aunty’s daughter was busy somewhere so aunty accompanied him along when she came to my house one evening. Such a smart and sincere boy he is! I welcomed him and offered him some cookies. While aunty got busy in her kitchen work, I noticed him sitting quietly, so I asked him for watching a cartoon on TV. His eyes sparkled and with so much of enthusiasm, he said yes for the cartoon. I scrolled one of the cartoon channels and felt happy that now he would not get bored. Within a few minutes, I found him disinterested for watching the cartoon running on the TV. I thought maybe he did not like that specific cartoon so I asked the little boy to change the channel. But his reply made me little emotional and worried as well. He said “Aunty this cartoon is in English. I can’t understand English much.”

I very well know the financial condition of my cook aunty’s house. Jimmy mother is mostly unwell so whatever they save working so hard, from house to house, they spend on her treatment. My cook aunty, although old enough to climb stairs 4-5 times in a day, is working even harder to support her daughter’s family. Jimmy goes to a nearby government school. We all know that government schools are still to touch that standard where they can teach good English to the students in early classes. That’s why Jimmy was not comfortable in watching English cartoon show. On the other hand, my 3-year-old can watch English cartoon shows whole day and he even understands what is happening with different cartoon characters. The reason is obvious. Understanding the growing influence of English these days, I am preparing my son well ahead. I talk him in English, read him English story books and explain him everything in Hindi and as well as in English. Unfortunately, Jimmy doesn’t have any such helping hand to prepare his mind for English exposure.
When I came to know about Nihar Shanti Amla’s Pathshala Funwala’s toll-free number 8055667788, Jimmy’s face instantly clicked in my mind. Yesterday only, I have given this number to my cook aunty, and I have explained to her how to use this phone service. She was very happy when I told her that Jimmy can now excel his English skill sitting at home. As it’s a toll-free number and there is no need of any smartphone, people from any class can access this service and can get benefited. I am sure, with using this toll-free number and this absolutely fun filled service, Jimmy can start his English learning from today only.

On calling, Pathshala Funwala’s toll-free number 8055667788, one can check this absolutely amazing IVR based service. Like in the advertisement of Nihar Shanti Amla, one can listen “Shanti Didi” doing a jolly conversation with two small boys “Abbu” and “Dabbu”. She makes them understand the different English words and their meaning in a nice and playful way.  The whole program starts at the very basic note, from telling how to say Namastey in English as the first lesson. Then there are IVR options to go to next level of English learning or even repeating the same lesson.

I found this ‘Pathshala Funwala’ initiative very helpful for small kids who can’t afford extra tuition for learning English. With this service, such kids can at-least make their foundation for English and can start understanding the basic English conversation, from enjoying cartoons to understanding English textbooks. This is also the best way to make them feel motivated and confident in life. And a confident childhood leads to a successful future and adulthood. Great initiative Nihar Shanti Amla!
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