Skip to main content

Why I hated Diwali in my childhood..

When I was in class third, on Diwali, we had an accident at home. My father got his right hand injured because of a cracker. Although there was some mistake from his side as well but that smash happened in front of me. Next two months were really very difficult to my parents. Because my father’s right hand was hurt, he was not able to work on even his basic body needs. Everything was done by my mother, from making him bath to feeding him, from helping him wear his office clothes to tying his shoe laces. As my mother was all busy with my father and rest of the times in completing her chores, she used to give me and my sister less attention. That was the first year of my life when I came to know that crackers can take one’s life. And I heard everyone saying “Chalo bas hath me hi problem hai…”  I was 8 years old and tall his made me hate this festival which had given my parents such an incalculable trouble. I used to think why people make, buy and burst crackers which can play with people’s life!

Since then we (me and my sister) never celebrated Diwali in much excitement. Although, my parents used to buy us new clothes on every Diwali but we never looked forward Diwali for fun. I used to get angry when kids of my colony used to start bursting crackers on the road which was just in front of my house.  The boil of my anger made me go outside and yell at those kids who were bursting crackers near my house. Diwali evening used to be boring for us (me and my sister) because we used to have nothing to do after pooja.  Then after few years, we started asking our father to give us the nearly equal amount of money which kids of our age used to waste in buying crackers.  And we sisters used to spend that money in getting CDs of new movies for enjoying them on Diwali evening.  When my schoolmates shared how many crackers they busted, I used to argue them counting the side effects of bursting crackers. This way, from childhood to my unmarried life, I never liked Diwali and even abhor this festival for how it is being celebrated.
After I got married, on my first Diwali at my in-law’s place, I saw the whole festival with a different angle. We did the pooja and then started a series of taking blessing from everyone in our joint family. I was so busy in eating sweets and meeting everyone that I didn’t notice kids were bursting crackers outside. Then my sister-in-law said to me, ”Shipra, let's go and enjoy sparklers outside.” I made my face but couldn’t deny her. We both went outside and lit sparklers. My niece was so happy to see those colors and lights. Although it was in my hand, but the smile on her face made me realize that not everything about Diwali is bad. Kids love sparklers and crackers. And in my own shell, I could never accept and appreciate it until that day.
Because of my own experience, which was bad, I always criticized the celebration of this festival. But now my perception has changed. Although I still believe Diwali is a festival of lights, not noise. Whether we should burst crackers or not, is a separate topic of debate but now I am not completely against of bursting crackers. A limited amount of cracker busting in presence of parents or any other responsible person seems okay to me. Most importantly I now believe Diwali celebration is the blissful feeling about being together and having a good time with family. It is way to bring smiles on faces and making the world luminous with lights and diyas. Rituals are secondary and firecrackers are tertiary, of course!
Listen This Post Stop Listening Post

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My Monsoon Love Hate Love Story

Last year, almost the same time, I packed every belonging of mine and landed to a place which is close to my heart. With bag and baggage, my family moved from Delhi to Lucknow. It was monsoon time when I came here and thank god I witnessed a prosperous rain. Lucknow, though smaller compared to Delhi, is a place I distinguish since childhood. The city of Nawabs is believed as the happiest city in India. As our move was well calculated, my husband and I made sure to have all those things in our lives that I missed being in Delhi. A bigger house (that we can afford), green surroundings, street food access that we missed in Delhi and people who talk in our native tongue.

The Hate Story

I hated the rain when I was in Delhi. My house was in a busy lane of a crowded Delhi locality, and I was living on the second floor of the building. Hence neither I had easy access to the road, nor to terrace. When it rained, I was forced to stay inside. Roads used to get sunk even after the rain of half an…

The Utopian World Of Smart Devices

I would like to start this post with telling readers my profession. I am a software professional who has a decade of experience in technology and software development. In those 10 years, I have very closely seen how technology has evolved. Of course, the first urge was the necessity that let every invention happen. And then technology got advanced to make the user experience better and further sound. In the chain of making every sort of experience pleasanter for users, the era of smart devices came. We all remember the time when smartphones came into the market. Before that, we had those dial phones and keypad mobiles. We were able to talk to the other party. But the progression of technology made it real to actually see with whom we talk. We still talk through phones but with added feel and warmth.

The Utopian World Of Smart Devices

Not only smartphones, but there has been an exponential increase in the number of smart devices around us in the last 5 years. When I first heard the ter…

The Tradition of Respecting and Celebrating Food

This post is for #BharatKaZaika is a blogging event conducted by #BlogBoosterIndia. 

A story to begin with

After winning the great battle of kurukshetra, Yudhisthira was now king of Hastinapur. And then one day, all of sudden Krishna went to Yudhishithira and started saying in urgency "dadasvannam dadasvannam dadasvannam yudhisthira (“Give food! Give food! Give food! Yudhisthira). As the great battle had affected everyone in the country, food was the first way to start giving relief to the suffering countrymen.  As suggested by Krishna, yudhisthira then organized the great asvamedha-yajna. Mahabharata records an extraordinary celebration of distributing food as a part of the sacred year-long rites and rituals.

Our food heritage

You see, In our country, there is a tradition of respecting and celebrating food. The spirit of classical Indian civilization guided that primary duty of the king is to ensure that none within his domain suffers from hunger. Hence the king ensured that people…