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The curse of birthing a girl.. finally proved wrong

A few days back, one of my family friends Ankita gave birth to a baby girl. Believe me, at first sight only, I fell in love with her tiny girl. During my usual chit-chat with my mother in-law, I told her that Ankita is blessed with a baby girl. Immediately she said in a low tone, "After so many difficulties, it's a girl!" Ankita carried a low line baby and because of few accidents, her pregnancy was little complicated. Although after delivery both the mother and the baby is doing well. But my mother in-law's reply made me think for a while. My mother in-law is a very caring lady. She looked after her father when he was not well during last few months of his life, despite the fact that she has three brothers who could have done this for their father. She proved herself better than boys when her parents needed her. But why still she thinks it's still important to birth a boy? I never asked her and perhaps would never ask her. Sometimes people are not gender biased but their experiences made them believe on it.
I remember when I was carrying my son; I went to my parent's place in 9th month of my pregnancy. As always happens, every one of my relatives and neighbors started observing my pregnancy symptoms for guessing the gender of my unborn baby. And maximum people hunched I was carrying a girl. During those days, a tale that my masi (my mother's elder sister) once shared with me, used to knock me so much. She told me that my Nani (my mother's mother) had a curse of birthing more girls and that curse passed to each of her daughters. That's why all my masis have more daughters, including my mother who has two daughters (no boys). Even my masi's daughter has only daughters and then was my turn (to birth a baby). My mother was little suspicious because my symptoms were screaming it was going to be a daughter again. I could understand her concern as our society still doesn't welcome a girl child well. People still have a preference for a boy child and unfortunately mothers are blamed for giving birth to a girl. 
Finally, the D day came and I was inside the labor room. My mother in-law was accompanying me there and I was really touched the way she was giving me strength to face the shrill. I battled the labor pain for long 5 hours and then my gyne asked my mother in-law to leave. She checked crowning of the baby head and started helping me in pushing the baby out. God bless her, she was so supportive! On my fourth push, the baby came out. I felt my stomach twisting and going inside. Behind my head, the pediatrician was standing. He examined the baby and announced that he was so happy with new born's health and weight. Next second only, I thanked almighty for blessing me with a healthy baby. My gyne was smiling and she asked me if I was not curious about the gender of my baby. I smiled back but kept myself mum. She then said, "Shipra Congratulation, it's a boy". 
The gloomy tale about the curse that my Nani, masis and mother carried finally proved wrong. I was joyful because I was blessed with a healthy boy. But I was more than happy because I broke the curse if there was any at all. I stopped that blue belief which was continuing with the birth of every girl child on my maternal side. I am not sure how this myth came in the picture and my masi addressed that a curse. But I am sure that it was because of family and society pressures, she believed it was a curse to birth a girl and all the girls in her family were born out of that bane.
When that so-called curse is banished, I really want to convey a message to my Nani, who has now gone so far. "Nani, you were never cursed and not any of your daughters were ever. Making a boy or girl is not in hands of humans. No curse ever passed from you to your daughters. But your strong will power and fighting spirit definitely passed to all your daughters and their daughters. Nani, you brought up your daughters so well and because of one of them, my existence is. You were actually lucky that all your children are living happily under the shadow of your blessings and fighting challenges of life the same way you did. You were really a Hero Nani!"

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