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Prince William says he cries more now that he’s a dad

You know who is Prince William? Prince William, The Duke of Cambridge, is the elder son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Diana, Princess of Wales. He is second in line to succeed his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, after his father. He belongs to the British royal family and has a military career. But above all he is now a father of two kids, Princess Charlotte and Prince George. Few days back he had been interviewed and he opened up about the effects of fatherhood in his life. Prince William admits fatherhood has made him cry more often and he finds himself worrying about "not being around to see his children grow up." Isn't it very touching?
Prince William lost his mother, Lady Diana, when he was 15 and that's why as a father he's more emotional now. He said he now cares for even the smallest things around his kids. As per the interview report, before becoming a father William wasn't that emotional. But being a father made him realize the importance of life and how precious it can be, especially with kids and family. As in his own words when he was asked more about his fatherhood, "You get affected by things that happen around the world or whatever a lot more I think as a father, just because you realize how precious life is and it puts it all in perspective, the idea of not being around to see your children grow up." He also shared that his parents often took his family to different charity events to help them understand there was more to the world than living in a palace. His parents wanted him to understand what was going on around him, outside his comfort zone. He made a point that what his parents were doing is really essential to put life lessons in young minds. He said it's important for kids to start seeing the broader picture of life which is not always luxurious and perfect. 
I feel as a father, Prince William is very normal without any royal touch. He thinks about kids and life in the same ways as every father does. He is sentimental and doesn't hesitate to show his emotional side to everyone. Even researchers have proved it that emotional support, both from mother and father, is imperative for a kid's life. Society is changing indeed. Now fathers are showing their emotions in public, even with tears sometimes. They are more open and more close to their kids. They are breaking the traditional image of a father who is least caring towards feelings. I think, today’s fast lifestyle needs fatherhood as equal and efficient as motherhood, especially when both the partners work. In the past, it was usually one kind of partnership, father in charge of making a living and mother in charge of looking after the children and giving emotional support to them. That worked for many years and, for some families, it still works well. But now mothers and fathers are more likely to share many roles. And that's how today's fathers are more demonstrative about feelings than ever before.
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